Change The World | Relationships

Debate: Interracial Relationships


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interracial-relationships

TWO VIEWPOINTS


POINT

InterracialLet’s face it. We live in a multicultural society. While in the past, people were more likely to “stick with their own kind,” we are seeing a significant growth in interracial relationships. By integrating with different cultures and nationalities, we are doing away with the seeds of hate, racism, and prejudice.

Interracial relationships provide individuals with the unique opportunity to learn, experience, and appreciate different cultures and backgrounds. We are given the opportunity to see the beauty in different nationalities and peoples. Most importantly, we are finally learning that the outer shell of a person does not change who they are on the inside. Deep within, we are all one in the same. Interracial relationships strengthen individuals and build harmony between different races. Learning and experiencing different cultures enrich us.

Some will argue that interracial couples need to deal with more differences and a greater number of challenges than “regular” couples – I would agree. I believe that by overcoming these differences interracial relationships become stronger and develop stability.

Finally, let us not forget the most important part of any relationship: love. An interracial couple is just as capable of loving each other as deeply as any other couple. If love is present in any relationship, great boundaries can be overcome. Any relationship will bring many challenges along with it, but one thing has always remained constant: true love will prevail.


COUNTER POINT

InterracialInterracial couples may have recently become very popular, but are they really working? Two people from two different backgrounds will likely experience a significant number of challenges and communication barriers. With different cultures come different customs. With different customs come misunderstandings. With misunderstandings come pain and grief.

Not only can interracial relationships result in unhappiness for the individuals involved, but it can also affect their family members. There might exist language barriers between families, making it difficult for the couple to live harmoniously with each other’s loved ones. This can cause unnecessary conflict and broken relationships.

Let’s suppose an interracial relationship goes on to become an interracial marriage. The problems suddenly become more serious. Interracial couples are constantly haunted by questions such as, “Which culture will my child belong to? What cultural values will I instil in my child? Will my son or daughter be ostracised from both ethnic backgrounds because s/he is mixed? Will they be confused as to their identity and heritage?”

What it all comes down to is what we try so hard to ignore: two people from two different cultures are not the same. They have different backgrounds, different customs, different beliefs, different ideas, and different lifestyles. Opposites might attract, but can they really survive?

 

All right, here’s an amazing interracial dating item…

Down in South Carolina, good ol’ Bob Jones University has a well-publicized ban on dating between the “races”. Yes, this is for real, in the year 2000. And to top it off, President George Bush proudly¬†went there to speak during his presidential campaign.

Excerpt from BJU Disciplinary Rules

There is to be no interracial dating.
1. Students who are partners in an interracial marriage will be expelled.
2. Students who are members of or affiliated with any group or organization which holds as one of its goals or advocates interracial marriage will be expelled.
3. Students who date outside of their own race will be expelled.
4. Students who espouse, promote, or encourage others to violate the University’s dating rules and regulations will be expelled.”

Editor’s Note: Apparently, all the bad press eventually forced BJU to change the interracial dating “ban” to “requiring parental permission”.



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